My Quick Review of a Chevrolet Sonic

I took a long drive in a 2012 Chevrolet Sonic today. I’d been looking at cars for quite some time since the 2005 Monte Carlo rebuild. The car still makes it from point A to point B, but because of its age, it’s falling apart everywhere else except the motor now. It’s about time to let it go. 

I’m a Chevy girl, so I won’t even look at or test-drive anything that’s not a Chevy, not for any reason of any kind. I’m leery of “new” stuff, too. I don’t like the idea of digital gauges, computer chips, funny-looking keys that regular stores can’t reproduce, or possible dealer repair dependence. No sir, I don’t like that idea at all because I enjoy working on Chevys myself. The Sonic is a pretty new car with funny looking keys and such, but I took a ride in it anyway.

I liked the salesman a lot. I liked that he didn’t try to sell me something I didn’t want. As soon as I said I preferred Chevys, he stopped talking about Toyotas and whatnot. I like a salesperson who listens to what the customer wants instead of pushing whatever he or she likes on the customer. I like Chevys. That’s the end of the story. Period. The salesperson respected that.

The one I test drove was an LT hatchback model with a manual transmission (stick shift). I was super-excited to drive it because I missed driving manual vehicles. I hadn’t driven one in about 15 years though, so I knew I would be rusty. 

I was very rusty. In fact, the salesman wasn’t even sure if I could really drive a stick because of the way I acted at first. I was fine after a while. I was just used to my own car. It felt weird to be in something else at first. I needed a few minutes to wrap my mind around the sudden change.

Once I got a feel for the gears, everything was fine. Shifting was not a problem for me. I really liked the car, too. First of all, it had much more KICK than I thought it would ever have. I think I yawned at the specs (1.4-Liter turbo, 138 hp), but then the little engine that could wowed me down the road. 

I could really feel the difference and how heavy and burdened my Monte Carlo was after I drove around in the Sonic. It was very sporty, which was not at all what I expected from a subcompact hatchback. I always thought hatchbacks looked corny. I still have reservations about the sawed-off looking back, but I think I can get over them.  

I was very pleased with the vehicle’s performance. It took off so swiftly that I had to work my arm to keep up with the shifting. It was extremely zippadocious for a hatchback, and it had tinted windows to boot. 

The cabin was very quiet as I darted down the highway. I'm not sure if that's good or bad since I get tired easily these days.

The CD player worked, and there was an aux hole in case I wanted to hook up something else. It had Bluetooth too, but I couldn’t bother with hooking it up to my phone at the time.

The handling was superb, and the seating was comfy. It was spacious enough for me, but not so much for the tall salesman.

This Sonic had no recalls. My Monte had a recall, but it never acted up in the expected manner. It just refused to start from time to time, and I had to wait 10 minutes sometimes. 

I researched the Sonic before I even looked at it, and I saw the excellent reviews it had on US News and Cars.com and such. I’m leaving another good one because it’s an amazing little snapper. It’s ideal for someone who likes a stick shift, is budget-conscious, and wants some punch out of the motor. It’ll provide a great workout for a frozen shoulder, too. 4.3 out of five stars. 


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